Wednesday, December 30, 2015

Moo-ve Along

Moo-ve Along
oil  12" x 12" on cradled panel
SOLD
$395.00 + $10. s/h

I loved the way this cow just stared at me.  She kept her eye on me the whole time that I was watching her.  Kind of like a dare who could stare the longest.  I also loved how she stayed behind the chamisas!

Happy New Year to all of you!  May the New Year bring you health and happiness.

Saturday, December 19, 2015

Aspen Grove

Aspen Grove
plein air oil  9" x 12"
$295.00 + $10. s/h
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Holiday price is $200.00
As I have done during past holiday seasons, all of my paintings are 25% off during December.  Changing all of the prices in my blog would be hard to do, so email and I'll send a Paypal button to you right away.   pamholnback@gmail.com
One last one from South Park Plein Air Arts Celebration Event.  This morning I had planned on painting a windmill.  I've driven past this windmill hundreds of times and thought it would make a great plein air piece.  However, the wind came up, I was out in the middle of nothing (there's lots of nothing near this spot)  my umbrella blew away, the dirt was all over me.  So, I decided to paint something else.  I drove back into town to find a location out of the wind.  I loved this grove.  It was calm and quiet on this dirt road.  No wind, no dirt.

Thursday, December 17, 2015

Old Bristlecone Pines

Old Bristlecone Pines
plein air oil  12" x 12"
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$395.00 + $10. s/h
Holiday price $300.00
As I have done during past holiday seasons, all of my paintings are 25% off during December.  Changing all of the prices in my blog would be hard to do, so email and I'll send a Paypal button to you right away.   pamholnback@gmail.com

This plein air piece is from earlier this fall near Fariplay, CO when I participated in the South Park Plein Air Arts Celebration plein air event.  One day we painted at Bristlecone View Ranch just outside of Fairplay.  This grove of trees was a bit away from the ranch and covered most of a hillside.  I looked up bristlecone pine in Wikipedia and found this:

All three species are long-lived and highly resilient to harsh weather and bad soils. One of the three species, Pinus longaeva, is the longest-lived life form on Earth; the oldest individual is more than 5,000 years old,[1] making it the oldest known individual of any species.
Despite their potential age and low reproductive rate, bristlecone pines, particularly Pinus longaeva, are usually a first succession species, tending to occupy new open ground.[2]They generally compete poorly in less-than-harsh environments, making them hard to cultivate.[2] In gardens, they succumb quickly to root rot.[3] They do very well, however, where most other plants cannot even grow, such as in rocky dolomitic soils in areas with virtually no rainfall.[2]
Bristlecone pine grow in scattered subalpine groves at high altitude in arid regions of the Western United States. The name comes from the prickles on the female cones.[4]

Wednesday, December 9, 2015

Old Odd Fellows Building

Old Odd Fellows Building
Oil 14" x 11"
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$395.00 + $10. s/h
Holiday price is $300.00
As I have done during past holiday seasons, all of my paintings are 25% off during December.  Changing all of the prices in my blog would be hard to do, so email and I'll send a Paypal button to you right away.   pamholnback@gmail.com

This building is on Front Street in Fairplay, CO.  As the title says, it's the old Odd Fellows building.  Although, it might still be the location of the Odd Fellows.  I googled "historic buildings in Fairplay" and found this:  The building on the right served several purposes. Among the ground floor tenants were Hathaway’s Bank and later the Patriotic Order of the Sons of America. The longest occupant of this building has been the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, which has met upstairs for 125 years.  

So, if the Odd Fellows Lodge is upstairs, maybe I should change the title.  Although, the building is still old.  This started as a plein air painting, but a few of the details were finished in my studio.

Monday, December 7, 2015

Summer Bouquet

Summer Bouquet
Oil  10" x 8"
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$195.00 + $10. s/h  or, during December, $150.00!
As I have done during past holiday seasons, all of my paintings are 25% off during December.  Changing all of the prices in my blog would be hard to do, so email and I'll send a Paypal button to you right away.   pamholnback@gmail.com

The bouquet was done late this past summer.  I love cosmos!  They seem so happy.  We should all be grateful for the happinesses in our lives!

Tuesday, November 24, 2015

Meandering River

Meandering River
plein air oil  16" x 12"
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$495.00 + $10. s/h

This piece was done in September in South Park as part of the Plein Air Event.  For people who live in locations with "normal" rivers this one is pretty small!  I loved the blue water against the blue mountains!

Sunday, November 22, 2015

Cowboy Hats

Cowboy Hats
plein air oil  14" x 11"
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$395.00 + $10. s/h

Earlier this fall I participated in the South Park Plein Air Arts Festival in Fairplay, CO.  This piece was painted one afternoon at Bristlecone View Ranch, just outside of Fairplay.  The ranch had an incredible barn, which was filled with historic western memorabilia.  The owners set out all kinds of props for us to use in paintings.  That afternoon was very windy, so I set up this still life right outside of the barn and stood at the barn entrance, where I was in the shade and out of the wind, to paint.

Saturday, November 14, 2015

Amber Waves Of Grain

Amber Waves Of Grain
plein air oil  9" x 12"
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$295.00 + $10. s/h

We were lucky to have had so much rain this past summer in Colorado.  It certainly made for great greens all summer and those greens became beautiful ochres and ambers this past fall.  This is another piece that I painted on our late September trip to Mancos, CO.  I loved all of the golden fields.

Katherine Lee Bates wrote "America The Beautiful" after a trip to Colorado Springs.  But, I think the words apply to Mancos, and I'm sure fields in other Colorado towns as well.

I photoed this painting dozens of times.  There are a few lighter highlights in the bottom grasses that wouldn't get quite light enough, no matter what lighting I used to photo.  Frustrating.

Sunday, November 8, 2015

In The Valley

In the Valley
plein air oil  9" x 12"
$295. + $10. s/h


One morning while in Mancos, CO I decided to explore the farming valley around the town.  I discovered never endless painting sights.  I look forward to another painting trip down there!  For this spot, I pulled over on a dirt road just outside of town.  I loved all of the colors of the grasses, trees and mountains in the back ground.  The occasional pickup, and bicyclist went by, but for the most part I had a great, quiet morning painting.

Friday, November 6, 2015

Grazing Cows



Grazing Cows
plein air oil  9" x 12"
$295.00 + $10. s/h


And yet another plein air painting from Mancos, CO in late September.  I painted almost from this same spot on our trip to Mancos in early September.  I loved the view of the neighboring ranches and I really loved that I could drive right up to this little overlook.  Sometimes the ease of just opening the trunk and walking 5 feet makes for a great plein air morning!

Wednesday, November 4, 2015

Taylor Raymond Gallery, Durango Opening

Great September Day  Oil  6" x 8"

Aspen Shadows  Oil  16" x 20"

This Thursday, November 5th is the Durango Opening for the traveling juried show,  Art For The Endangered Landscape:  Honoring Wolf Creek.  The opening is part of Durango's First Thursday Art Walk and will be at Taylor Raymond Gallery 835 Main Ave., Durango, CO from 5-8 pm.  Hope those of you who live in the Durango area can go!  I'm honored to have had these two pieces juried into the show.

Saturday, October 31, 2015

Nearby Ranch

Nearby Ranch
plein air oil  9" x 12"
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$295.00 + $10. s/h


I did this painting from just about the same spot as the one in my last post.  I just turned my easel a bit and had a great view of another ranch.  These two ranches were adjacent to the ranch that we were visiting.  As you can see, there wasn't much sun, so there are no strong lights or shadows.  But, nevertheless, any day painting is a great day.  Painting theses ranches allowed me to mix lots of greens!

As I often do when looking for a painting title I use Google.  So, I googled "hay".  I ended up on farm collector.com (which I have to admit I didn't know existed) and learned all of this:

From Farm Collector.com:
Today, petroleum-based  products are essential to farm operations. But for thousands of years, fodder – specifically, hay – was the most critical form of fuel on the farm. Up to the late 18th century, the process of making hay remained essentially unchanged. By the 1850s, though, the impact of the Industrial Revolution on farming equipment history was unmistakable. 
In this article, the first segment of a three-part series on hay equipment (see Part 2 and Part 3), the focus is on mowers. Farmers who still cut hay with sickles or scythes well into the mid-1800s were quick to embrace new technology. One of the most labor-intensive chores a farmer faced, the harvest and storage of hay was hard, hot and dusty work. Mowers were the first step toward making that job less brutal and more productive. 
References to cutting and drying grass for fodder are found as far back as Biblical times. Up to the late 18th century, though, the process of manual mowing remained essentially unchanged. 

A difficult evolution

Robert L. Ardrey compiled the history of companies and inventors who played key roles in the history of American agriculture in his 1894 book American Agricultural Implements. Ardrey acknowledged that early mower inventors had a difficult time moving away from their attempts to imitate the cutting motion involved in the manual harvest of hay.
“It was this natural primitive movement that the first constructors of both reapers and mowers tried to imitate or reproduce in their machines,” Ardrey wrote. “Early American inventors of mowers persistently endeavored to make practically operative this original principle. Indeed, it was many years before the rotary or scythe-curve theory of cutting was abandoned.”
Peter Gaillard, Lancaster, Pa., is credited with conceiving the idea of mowing grass with horse power in 1812. Several crude reaping machines were produced prior to that time in England, but none proved practical enough to come into general use. In his research, Ardrey found that the early interchangeable use of the words “mow” and “reap” had already made it difficult to clearly identify the origin of the earliest mowers.
“As reapers and mowers belong to the same original general class – harvesters – and have so many features in common,” Ardrey wrote, “it is somewhat difficult at times to draw the line between them. In many of the older patents they are described as machines for reaping and mowing, having been designed for both purposes. And in some specifications they are described first as one and then as the other without distinction of purpose. So one cannot always clearly understand to which division of the general class the inventor intended his machine, or to which it really belonged.”
Jeremiah Bailey, Chester County, Pa., patented a mower (or grass-cutting machine) in February 1822. It was supported by two wheels on different axles and was said capable of mowing 10 acres per day. John Wadsworth, Portsmouth, R.I., obtained a patent in 1824 for a horse scythe. A year later, in 1825, Ezra Cope and Thomas Hoopes Jr., both also of Chester County, applied for a patent on a mowing machine similar to Bailey’s. Their machine was more simply constructed and said to be “of better form.”

Thursday, October 29, 2015

Freshly Hayed Fields

Freshly Hayed Fields
plein air oil  9" x 12"
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$295.00 + $10. s/h



In early September my husband and I spent several days on a ranch in Mancos, CO which is near Mesa Verde National Park or the Four Corners area.  It was a bit over cast almost everyday, but still quite green from all the rain we had in Colorado over the summer.  Many of the ranchers were cutting, or had just cut, the hay.  I didn't know much about hay, except that I love painting hay bales. You have a short period where you can cut and bale the hay.  It can't sit too long on the ground.  It's interesting to get a peek at something different than your usual life.

Tuesday, October 27, 2015

A Bit Closer

A Bit Closer
Plein air oil  6" x 6"
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$100.00 + $10. s/h

This is the second piece that I did from the bird observation tower...see my last post.  I had a bit of extra time and this small canvas panel, so focused in and did a close-up of a section of the tidal marsh.

Saturday, October 24, 2015

Tidal Wetlands

Tidal Wetlands
plein air oil  6" x 12"
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$195.00 + $10. s/h


Late this past summer I was in New Jersey visiting my sisters.  My sister, Natalie Italiano, is also a painter, so our visits together always include painting.  This piece is from the tidal wetlands in Brigantine, NJ near Atlantic City.

I had never heard of these wetlands.  I loved the soft look of the grasses contrasted against the water and sky, sometimes blue, gray or pink depending on the weather and time of day.  As I often do when posting on my blog I googled these wetlands.  Here is some of the information:  The Brigantine Bay and marsh complex includes the open water and tidal wetlands of, from north to south: Little Bay, Reed Bay, Somers Bay, Absecon Bay and Channel, Lakes Bay, and Scull Bay between the mainland coast of New Jersey and the barrier islands from Little Egg Inlet southwest to Great Egg Harbor Inlet.  This portion of the New Jersey backbarrier lagoon estuarine system is very significant for migrating and wintering waterfowl, colonial nesting waterbirds, migratory shorebirds, and fisheries.


Below are some photos, from 2 separate days,  from the marsh.  We painted from a bird watching tower so had a great view looking down into the marsh.





Wednesday, October 14, 2015

Hay Barn

Hay Barn
plein air oil  9" x 12"
Off To A New Home!

I was lucky to have spent 6 days in September painting on a ranch in Mancos, CO;  three days the first week of the month and three days the last week of the month.  Mancos is near Mesa Verde National Park, near the Four Corners, about 6 1/2 hours from Colorado Springs.

Living on a ranch must be fun and exciting, but oh so much work!  While we were there the hay had just been bailed and this barn was full of horse hay, which I learned is different than cow hay.  Horse hay has to be covered.  Cow hay can be left out.  Also while we were there a cow died, a cow got out,  sixty cows had to be moved to a different pasture, the ranch dog got hurt, a fence was painted, an electric fence had to be installed, feed had to be picked up 60 miles away.  It's never endless.  My hat (my cowboy hat) goes off to all ranchers and farmers!

Monday, October 12, 2015

Tucked Away Pond

Tucked Away Pond
plein air Oil  9" x 12"
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$195.00 + $10. s/h

This is from this morning's paint out with friends.  We hiked a short way in at Austin Bluffs Open Space to this little pond that was tucked away just off the trail.  The fall weather here in Colorado Springs is gorgeous.  We're having the most beautiful colors!  Way too pretty to be inside!

Saturday, October 10, 2015

Square Shovel


Square Shovel
Oil  8" x 8"
SOLD

This painting sold last summer to a couple here in Colorado Springs.  When they purchased it I asked them if they were gardeners, or buying it as a gift for gardeners.  They told me that they had lost their home in one of the two fires we've had in the last five years and this represented them digging back their lives.  (More than 700 homes were lost in our two fires.)  I love it when I get to meet the client who buys a painting, but this represents so much.  I was humbled.

Thursday, October 8, 2015

Garden Table

Garden Table
plein air Oil  8" x 10"
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$195.00 + $10. s/h

This plein air piece was done this summer at my friend, Suzanne's.  I love painting in her back yard.  She is so gracious.  She bakes muffins, makes lemonade, and sets up little vignettes around her yard and garden of things that she thinks might be fun to paint.  I loved this little tea pot on the bright table.  And she's right;  not only was it fun yo paint, but sitting there for a cup of tea would also be fun!

Monday, October 5, 2015

Getting Ready To Rain

Getting Ready To Rain
Oil  18" x 24"
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This painting was going to be another wild flower piece.  One summer morning I received an email from my friend, Marianne, who lives about an hour east of me.  She wanted to let me know that the plains out east were covered with spectacular wild flowers.  Shortly there after I headed to the eastern plains with every intent of painting fields of flowers.  But, during my drive the clouds started coming in and I knew it would rain shortly.  So, I went with the flow and took photos of the clouds.  They were magnificent in all of their color.  This was a studio piece done soon after and the plein air wild flowers painting was put on hold for another day!

Saturday, October 3, 2015

Abundance Of Wild Flowers

Abundance Of Wild Flowers
plein air oil  10" x 8"
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$195.00 + $10. s/h

This plein air painting is from this summer.  The location was about an hour west of Colorado Springs near Tarryall.  My plein air group went to the mountains to paint the wild flowers.  Earlier this summer we had more rain than normal (normal for Colorado is 15" of moisture per year...not very much!)  I think this year we had about that much in May and June, well, almost.  Anyway, the mountains were filled with wild flower color!

Thursday, September 24, 2015

"Art For The Endangered Landscape: Honoring Wolf Creek" Juried Show


Aspen Shadow  Oil  16" x 20"

Great September Day  Oil  6" x 8"

I'm thrilled that these two paintings have been juried into the show "Art For The Endangered Landscape:  Honoring Wolf Creek".   The opening for this traveling art show and sale is Saturday September 26th from 4-7pm at the Pagosa Springs Center for the Arts, Pagosa Springs, Colorado.  The show will hang in Pagosa Springs until November 1st.  From there it will travel to Durango, Colorado for an opening on November 5th from 5-8 at the Taylor Raymond Gallery 835 Main Ave.  The exhibit will be in Durango until November 22nd.  It will then travel to Alamosa, Colorado where it will be at the Community Partnerships Gallery, ASU Campus.  The Alamosa reception will be Friday December 4th from 4-7.  The show concludes December 20th.  I hope that if you are in any of these towns you'll visit the show!

Tuesday, September 22, 2015

Sun Kissed

Sun Kissed
Oil  6" x 6"
SOLD
$100.00 + $10. s/h

And another sunflower from our backyard.  I know that sun-kist is used for oranges and orange juice, but, I think that it works for sunflowers.

And, a photo from our garden:

Monday, September 21, 2015

Touching The Sky

Touching The Sky
Oil  6" x 6"
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$100.00 + $10. s/h

This is a painting that I did last month.  I'm catching up with pieces that I haven't posted, yet.  I was out of town for 3 weeks, did lots of painting, but not posting.

Anyway, I realized that this piece has almost the same composition as a larger 12" x 12" sunflower that I previously posted.  I must like this angle when I'm in our backyard.  It's off to a new home!

Monday, September 14, 2015

Polished Boulders

Polished Boulders
plein air oil  12" x 9"
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$295.00 + $10. s/h

This is the second plein air painting done last month in Eleven Mile Canyon.  I like zooming in on little areas and giving the viewer a close up look at what I saw.

Saturday, September 12, 2015

Tree Reflections

Tree Reflections
plein air oil  10" x 8"
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$195.00 + $10. s/h

One day last month a group of plein air artists went to 11 Mile Canyon, about an hour west of Colorado Springs in Lake George, to paint on the free state park day.  I had expected it to be really crowded, but found only a few fisherman and some picnicers.

If you google 11 Mile Canyon you'll find out that:
"Eleven Mile Canyon Recreation Area is located below the dam of the Eleven Mile Reservoir near Lake George in the southeast corner of South Park.  The narrow, dirt road traversing the canyon used to be the old Colorado Midland Railroad bed before the dam and reservoir were constructed.  Unlike the reservoir area, which has an open basin and rangeland type topography, the canyon itself is forested, lush, and rocky.  Eleven Mile Canyon cuts through the plain holding the South Platte River in its rocky bottom.  As the river is unleashed from the dam above, it twists and crashes against huge boulders lining the canyon floor.  A canopy of large trees provides a screen of shade that floats across the canyon with the moving sun.  Eleven Mile Canyon is an unexpected paradise."

Thursday, September 10, 2015

Looking Up The River

Looking Up The River
plein air oil  10" x 8"
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$195.00 + $10. s/h

This is the second piece that I painted on The Frying Pan River.  I love the almost abstract, loose quality of this one.  River water is constantly moving and changing color depending on the weather and sky color.

Tuesday, September 8, 2015

On The Frying Pan

On The Frying Pan
plein air oil  10" x 8"
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$195.00 + $10. s/h

Recently my husband and I were in Basalt, Colorado on the western slope for a fishing and painting trip.  It's a gorgeous 4 hour drive from Colorado Springs.  It's great that fishing and plein air painting go hand in hand.  So, while my husband was off fishing, I set up along the river bed to paint.

I've seen lots of great paintings of clear river water.  I think that it's a challenge to paint rivers, especially clear ones.  These rocks were so colorful that I wasn't sure if it would read that they're under water.  But, I told myself to just "paint what you see"  and painted away.

The Frying Pan River is a tributary of the Roaring Fork River...don't you just love these names?  According to local legend when a group of trappers were attacked by a band of Ute Indians, only two men survived, one of whom was injured.  Leaving his wounded friend in a cave close by, the last man left to get help.  He hung a frying pan in a tree so that he could find the cave again upon his return.





Saturday, September 5, 2015

Following The Sun

Following The Sun
Oil  12" x 12"
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$295.00 + $10. s/h

This was also in our backyard.  I love these bigger sunflowers, but most of the flowers that just plant themselves are the littler ones that look like a mix of sunflower and black-eyed susan.

Thursday, September 3, 2015

Summer Sun

Summer Sun
Oil  12" x 12"
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$295.00 + $10. s/h

My last few posts were of fields of sunflowers.  Now a couple of sunflowers close up.  We have these growing in our back yard, as well as the field by our house.  I love it when paintings are right there in front of me!

Wednesday, August 26, 2015

Golden Hue

Golden Hue
plein air oil  8" x 10"
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$195.00 + $10 s/h

This view of Bear Creek Park was done almost by just turning around where I was in the last post.  I was standing on the side of a path with fields of sunflowers on both sides.  It's just been a spectacular wildflower summer!  No complaints here!

Here's a picture from the park:

As I said in the last post, if you squint the meadow is just yellow!

Monday, August 24, 2015

Blaze Of Yellow

Blaze Of Yellow
plein air oil  8" x 10"
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$195.00 + $10. s/h

This is another Bear Creek Park sunflowers plein air piece.  Once again, I headed over to the park to paint before breakfast.  As I said, we live right next door to this incredible almost 700 acre park.  I've walked its' trails thousands of times, painted it in different seasons dozens of times, enjoyed its' sunrises for years.

Normally, I tone my canvases in yellow ochre, but here I used cad red light.  I love the way the bits of color peek through.

Saturday, August 22, 2015

Yellow Orchestra

Yellow Orchestra
plein air oil  8" x 10"
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$195.00 + $10 s/h

While much of the country is having a drought, especially California, here in Colorado we've had more rain this summer than in the last 20 years.  Every thing so so green and there are wildflowers every where!!  The last 3 weeks we've had fields of the most amazing, tiny sunflowers.  In years past the meadows were a beautiful yellow ochre.  Right now when you look at a field while squinting, you see nothing but yellow.

This is a recent plein air piece done in Bear Creek Park, right next to our house.  I went down several mornings with my coffee and paints.  We are so lucky to live in such a beautiful location!

Thursday, August 20, 2015

Backyard Rose

Backyard Rose
Oil  6" x 6"
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$100.00 + $10. s/h

These roses were in our backyard earlier this summer.  This one was in a bud vase and made a great, little centerpiece.  It also made a wonderful painting!

At one point I knew all the names of our roses.  I suppose that I should figure that out.  Or, better yet, I should make name tags.  That was a great thing about the Garden Tour that I posted about.  The flowers were all identified.  Even thought I've forgotten the name, I still love this rose with all the nuances of pink and peach.

Tuesday, August 18, 2015

Sweet, Little Chair

Sweet, Little Chair
Oil  8" x 10"
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$195.00 + $10. s/h

This is the third painting from the recent Garden Tour.  We were invited to tour the gardens in advance to help us choose our locations.  No one had the chance to tour each garden.  This was the first grade that I toured.  Immediately I knew that I wanted to paint this little chair on the front porch. It is so sweet!  Interesting that I painted chairs at two locations.

Right now I have this painting sitting temporarily in a simple, black frame.  It looks great!  I might re-photo this.  The painting is just a bit brighter.

Sunday, August 16, 2015

Caliente Coral

Caliente Coral
Oil  8" x 10"
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$195.00 + $10. s/h

This is the second painting done during the recent Garden Tour.  This was started in a beautiful yard on Saturday afternoon.  This yard had beautiful flowers, but it had so many seating areas, that the yard, was truly an extension of the house.  I heard many people comment that this was one of their favorite yards.

Each yard had at least one garden docent to answer questions.  One of them came to see what I was painting.  I commented that this geranium had such coral colors.  She told me that is because this is called "Caliente Coral".  No wonder!  So, I Googled "Caliente Coral" and sure enough it is a hybrid geranium created to withstand heat.

Friday, August 14, 2015

Restful Garden

Restful Garden
Oil  12" x 16"
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$495.00 + $10. s/h

Recently, several members of my plein air group, Garden Artists, painted in private gardens on a local garden tour.  It was a great event;  a huge tour, beautiful gardens, wonderful people, and new locations for plein air work.  We were thrilled to have been invited.

These adirondack chairs were in the back yard of the house where I painted Saturday morning.  They were right outside the back door and seemed like such a great place for a restful moment, perhaps enjoying a cup of coffee in the morning or a glass of wine in the early evening.

The owners of the house told me that their son got them these Adirondack chairs many years ago in Maine.  I Googled "Adirondack chairs" to learn a bit more.  Here is what I learned:  "The first Adirondack chair was designed by Thomas Lee while vacationing in Westport, New York, in the Adirondack Mountains in 1903. Needing outdoor chairs for his summer home, he tested his early efforts on his family. After arriving at a final design for a "Westport plank chair," he offered it to a carpenter friend in Westport in need of a winter income, Harry Bunnell.[1] Bunnell saw the commercial potential of such an item being offered to Westport's summer residents, and apparently without asking Lee's permission filed for and received U.S. patent #794,777 in 1905.[2] Bunnell manufactured hemlock plank "Westport chairs" for the next twenty years, painted in green or medium dark brown, and individually signed by him."

I wasn't able to finish any of the paintings on location during the Garden Tour as there were so many people attending.  It was a great opportunity to meet new people and share my art.  I finished this piece later in my studio.

Friday, August 7, 2015

All Colorado Juried Show


I'm honored that my painting, "Bear Creek Snow" received an Honorable Mention in 
the Littleton Fine Arts Guild's All Colorado Juried Show.  The show is hanging at the 
Depot Art Center, 2069 West Powers Ave in Littleton, CO through most of August. 
Stop by the Depot Art Center if you're in Littleton. 

Wednesday, August 5, 2015

Pink Champagne

Pink Champagne
Oil  8" x 10"
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$195.00 + $10. s/h

These little roses are from our back yard.  We've had a very wet summer, with not many really hot days.  But, the day that I wanted to paint these, it was in the high 80's and they are in the sun.  So, I moved my easel inside and set up right in front of the window.  I was out of the sun, the flowers were very close.  I'm not sure if this is a "plein air" painting.  Is it plein air when the artist and subject are outside?   Or, can the artist be looking out a window?